47 Left Turns

Just a guy caught in a circle. Day-to-day.
Would much rather be floating in space.

Snow, art, space, & a general concern for humanity.


Reblogged from colchrishadfield
colchrishadfield:

Good morning! An unusual perspective on Earth’s aurora - the Southern Lights, full circle over Antarctica.

colchrishadfield:

Good morning! An unusual perspective on Earth’s aurora - the Southern Lights, full circle over Antarctica.

Reblogged from gifak-net
ohitsjustkim:

this is the kind of betrayal you have to be prepared for in the big bad world, kid

ohitsjustkim:

this is the kind of betrayal you have to be prepared for in the big bad world, kid

(via theunicornkittenkween)

Reblogged from ayexzee

ayexzee:

Boltie!

Reblogged from ghostofanidiot
"I wanna show you something."

Reblogged from bestlols

(via lolzpicx)

Reblogged from iliveinaspiralgalaxy
Reblogged from -circa

Reblogged from kushandwizdom

(Source: kushandwizdom, via warf4re)

Reblogged from intothepowdersnow
intothepowdersnow:

Sylvain Bourbousson in Courmayeur, Italy - Photo by Ahriel Povic

intothepowdersnow:

Sylvain Bourbousson in Courmayeur, Italy - Photo by Ahriel Povic

(via born-to-snowboard)

Reblogged from jtotheizzoe

jtotheizzoe:

Whoa.

How many planets? is an interactive feature from New Scientist detailing the late Kepler exoplanet-hunting spacecraft’s planetary haul. 

Kepler focused its gaze on a tiny piece of the sky near the constellation Cygnus, about 150,000 stars. By looking for small dips in a star’s intensity caused by a planet orbiting in front of it, the Kepler team tallied 3,588 possible exoplanets.

By then throwing out all the big boys that are nothing like Earth (down to 1,696) and then focusing on the planets that are in their star’s habitable zone (where the conditions could allow for liquid water on its surface), they narrowed it down to 51 possible Earth-like exoplanets.

Not that many, eh? Well, keep in mind that Kepler would miss planets who weren’t in the right orientation or orbited dim stars. A few calculation corrections tick that number up to 22,500…

Finally, Kepler was only looking at 0.28% of the sky. Expand it to the whole of the Milky Way, and you get something like 15-30 billion possible Earth-like planets. (I want to emphasize the possible there, because really, who knows?)

Kepler may be gone, but I can’t wait to see what future planet-hunting missions, using different detection strategies like gravitational distortion and newer imaging equipment, can find. Earth is definitely not alone. The real question for our time is this: Are we alone?

Explore the full interactive at New ScientistFor more exoplanet explorations, check out Lee Billings’ new book Five Billion Years of Solitude: The Search For Life Among The Stars

(via here-comes-the-universe)

Reblogged from lifeinsnow

Reblogged from lunartes

(Source: lunartes, via the-real-gold)

Reblogged from mlloydart

mlloydart:

Chalk Art by David Zinn

(via epicjournal)

Reblogged from pleasingg

(Source: pleasingg, via epicjournal)

Reblogged from outcamethesun

(Source: outcamethesun, via epicjournal)